Menu Close

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Patient Resources

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Patient Resources

Welcome to our resource center dedicated to helping patients better understand Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD). 

Whether you’re seeking information for yourself or a loved one, our goal at the Vascular Institute of Ohio is to provide clear, reliable information to help you understand PAD, its symptoms, risk factors, treatment options, and more.

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Patient Resources

Welcome to our resource center dedicated to helping patients better understand Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD). 

Whether you’re seeking information for yourself or a loved one, our goal at the Vascular Institute of Ohio is to provide clear, reliable information to help you understand PAD, its symptoms, risk factors, treatment options, and more.

 

What is Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)?

Peripheral Artery Disease, commonly referred to as PAD, is a circulatory condition that occurs when there is a buildup of plaque in the arteries that supply blood to your limbs. This buildup restricts blood flow, primarily affecting the arteries in the legs. 

Left untreated, PAD can lead to serious complications, including pain, difficulty walking, and in severe cases, limb amputation.

 

Peripheral Artery Disease FAQ’s

Q: What causes Peripheral Artery Disease?
A: The primary cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, a condition where fatty deposits (plaque) accumulate in the arteries, narrowing and eventually blocking them.

Q: Are there any early warning signs of PAD?
A: Yes, common signs include leg pain or cramping during activity, slow-healing sores on the legs, and changes in skin color or temperature.

Q: Is PAD a common condition?
A: Yes, PAD is a prevalent condition, particularly in individuals over the age of 50. Smoking, diabetes, and high blood pressure increase the risk.

 

Treatment Options for Peripheral Artery Disease

Effective management of PAD involves lifestyle changes, medications, and, in some cases, surgical intervention. 

 

Treatment for Peripheral Artery Disease  (PAD) may include:

  • Lifestyle Modifications: Adopting a healthier lifestyle through regular exercise, smoking cessation, and a heart-healthy diet.
  • Medications: Prescribed medications to manage symptoms and control risk factors such as high blood pressure and cholesterol.
  • Interventional Procedures: Procedures like angioplasty or stent placement may be recommended to improve blood flow.
  • Surgery: In severe cases, bypass surgery may be necessary to reroute blood around blocked arteries.

 

Signs and Symptoms of Peripheral Artery Disease

Recognizing the signs and symptoms of PAD is crucial for early detection and intervention. 

 

Common indications include:

  • Leg pain or cramping during activity
  • Numbness or weakness in the legs
  • Slow-healing sores or wounds on the legs
  • Changes in leg color or temperature

 

Risk Factors

Several factors contribute to the development of PAD, including:

  • Smoking
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Age (particularly those over 50)
  • Family history of cardiovascular diseases

 

Facts and Statistics About Peripheral Artery Disease

  • Approximately 8 to 12 million Americans are affected by PAD.
  • PAD is often underdiagnosed, with many individuals not experiencing symptoms until the disease is advanced.
  • People with PAD have an increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

 

Glossary of Peripheral Artery Disease Terminology

Atherosclerosis: The buildup of plaque composed of cholesterol, fat, and other substances, on the walls of arteries.

Angioplasty: A medical procedure to widen narrowed or blocked arteries.

Stent: A small mesh tube placed in an artery to keep it open and improve blood flow.

Bypass Surgery: Surgical procedure to create a new route for blood flow, bypassing blocked arteries.

 


 

Thank you for visiting our Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Patient Resources page.

Empower yourself with knowledge, and remember, early detection and proactive management are keys to living a healthier life with Peripheral Artery Disease. 

If you have specific questions or concerns, please contact the Vascular Institute of Ohio friendly office staff for an appointment or consultation with one of our physicians.